ancientart:

A quick look at: the Celtic carnyx, and accounts of their use from ancient sources.
"Their trumpets again are of a peculiar barbarian kind; they blow into them and produce a harsh sound which suits the tumult of war"
             -Greek Historian Diodorus Siculus (60-30 BC), Histories, 5.30.
The carnyx was a type of bronze trumpet used between c. 200 BC and c. AD 200 in Iron Age Europe, primarily by the Iron Age Celts. They were styled in the shape of an animal’s head, such as that of an open-mouthed boar. The carnyx was used in warfare, spurring troops into battle, and intimidating opponents. The upright carriage of the instrument allowed its bellowing sound to be heard over those in battles or in ceremonies. Greek historian Polybius (c. 200–c. 118 BC) was so impressed by the Gallic army’s use of them battle, he wrote:
"There were countless trumpeters and horn blowers and since the whole army was shouting its war cries at the same time there was such a confused sound that the noise seemed to come not only from the trumpeters and the soldiers but also from the countryside which was joining in the echo."
The first image is of reconstructions of the Celtic carnyx at the Celtic Museum in Hallein, photo taken by Wolfgang Sauber.
The second image is a detail from the Gundestrup Cauldron (200 BC-300 AD) showing figures with carnyx, currently located at the National Museum of Denmark, photo taken by Bloodofox.
Zoom Info
ancientart:

A quick look at: the Celtic carnyx, and accounts of their use from ancient sources.
"Their trumpets again are of a peculiar barbarian kind; they blow into them and produce a harsh sound which suits the tumult of war"
             -Greek Historian Diodorus Siculus (60-30 BC), Histories, 5.30.
The carnyx was a type of bronze trumpet used between c. 200 BC and c. AD 200 in Iron Age Europe, primarily by the Iron Age Celts. They were styled in the shape of an animal’s head, such as that of an open-mouthed boar. The carnyx was used in warfare, spurring troops into battle, and intimidating opponents. The upright carriage of the instrument allowed its bellowing sound to be heard over those in battles or in ceremonies. Greek historian Polybius (c. 200–c. 118 BC) was so impressed by the Gallic army’s use of them battle, he wrote:
"There were countless trumpeters and horn blowers and since the whole army was shouting its war cries at the same time there was such a confused sound that the noise seemed to come not only from the trumpeters and the soldiers but also from the countryside which was joining in the echo."
The first image is of reconstructions of the Celtic carnyx at the Celtic Museum in Hallein, photo taken by Wolfgang Sauber.
The second image is a detail from the Gundestrup Cauldron (200 BC-300 AD) showing figures with carnyx, currently located at the National Museum of Denmark, photo taken by Bloodofox.
Zoom Info

ancientart:

A quick look at: the Celtic carnyx, and accounts of their use from ancient sources.

"Their trumpets again are of a peculiar barbarian kind; they blow into them and produce a harsh sound which suits the tumult of war"

             -Greek Historian Diodorus Siculus (60-30 BC)Histories, 5.30.

The carnyx was a type of bronze trumpet used between c. 200 BC and c. AD 200 in Iron Age Europe, primarily by the Iron Age Celts. They were styled in the shape of an animal’s head, such as that of an open-mouthed boar. The carnyx was used in warfare, spurring troops into battle, and intimidating opponents. The upright carriage of the instrument allowed its bellowing sound to be heard over those in battles or in ceremonies. Greek historian Polybius (c. 200–c. 118 BC) was so impressed by the Gallic army’s use of them battle, he wrote:

"There were countless trumpeters and horn blowers and since the whole army was shouting its war cries at the same time there was such a confused sound that the noise seemed to come not only from the trumpeters and the soldiers but also from the countryside which was joining in the echo."

The first image is of reconstructions of the Celtic carnyx at the Celtic Museum in Hallein, photo taken by Wolfgang Sauber.

The second image is a detail from the Gundestrup Cauldron (200 BC-300 AD) showing figures with carnyx, currently located at the National Museum of Denmark, photo taken by Bloodofox.

archaicwonder:

Hellenistic gold olive wreath diadem Circa 3rd Century BC
The diadem composed of sheet gold over a tubular core, decorated with several long spear-shaped leaves with impressed veins and delicate hollow gold fruits, all attached to the core with twisted gold wire, a composition of four larger leaves and four berries at the centre.

archaicwonder:

Hellenistic gold olive wreath diadem Circa 3rd Century BC


The diadem composed of sheet gold over a tubular core, decorated with several long spear-shaped leaves with impressed veins and delicate hollow gold fruits, all attached to the core with twisted gold wire, a composition of four larger leaves and four berries at the centre.